F16 FIGHTING FALCON

The General Dynamics F-16 Fighting Falcon


(now Lockheed Martin) a multirole jet fighter aircraft originally developed by General Dynamics for the United States Air Force (USAF).


Designed as an air superiority day fighter, it evolved into a successful all-weather multirole aircraft. Over 4,500 aircraft have been built since production was approved in 1976.


Although no longer being purchased by the U.S. Air Force, improved versions are still being built for export customers. In 1993, General Dynamics sold its aircraft manufacturing business to the Lockheed Corporation,[3] which in turn became part of Lockheed Martin after a 1995 merger with Martin Marietta.


The Fighting Falcon is a fighter with numerous innovations including a frameless bubble canopy for better visibility, side-mounted control stick to ease control while maneuvering, a seat reclined 30 degrees to reduce the effect of g-forces on the pilot, and the first use of a relaxed static stability/fly-by-wire flight control system helps to make it a nimble aircraft



In addition to active duty U.S. Air Force, Air Force Reserve Command, and Air National Guard units, the aircraft is also used by the USAF aerial demonstration team, the U.S. Air Force Thunderbirds, and as an adversary/aggressor aircraft by the United States Navy.


The F-16 has also been procured to serve Lockheed Martin)nUMBER bUINumber Buil.


North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) allies Belgium, Denmark, the Netherlands, and Norway were seeking to replace their F-104G fighter-bombers.



The F-16 is a single-engine, very maneuverable, supersonic, multi-role tactical fighter aircraft.


The F-16 was designed to be a cost-effective combat "workhorse" that can perform various kinds of missions and maintain around-the-clock readiness.


It is much smaller and lighter than its predecessors, but uses advanced aerodynamics and avionics, including the first use of a relaxed static stability/fly-by-wire (RSS/FBW) flight control system, to achieve enhanced maneuver performance.


Highly nimble, the F-16 can pull 9-g maneuvers and can reach a maximum speed of over Mach 2.


Role


National origin


Manufacturer



First flight


Introduction


Status


Primary usew Lockheed Martin)



Number Build


Multirole jet fighter


United States


General Dynamics

Lockheed Martin


January 1974


17 August 1978


In service, in production


United States Air Force

25 other users (see operators page)


4,500+

General characteristics


Crew: 1


Length: 49 ft 5 in (15.06 m)


 Wingspan: 32 ft 8 in (9.96 m)


 Height: 16 ft (4.88 m)


Wing area: 300 ft² (27.87 m²)


 Empty weight: 18,900 lb (8,570 kg)


 Loaded weight: 26,500 lb (12,000 kg)


 Max. takeoff weight: 42,300 lb (19,200 kg)


 Powerplant: 1 × F110-GE-100 afterburning turbofan Dry thrust: 17,155 lbf (76.3 Template:Newton (unit))


 Thrust with afterburner: 28,600 lbf (127 kN)

 

 Maximum speed:


At sea level: Mach 1.2 (915 mph, 1,470 km/h)[51]

At altitude: Mach 2+ (1,500 mph, 2,410 km/h[1]) clean configuration